Dillon XL750 or Super 1050

Looking at stepping up into reloading after experiencing a friends XL650 and weighing the difference between the XL750 and Super 1050. I very much like the changes in the XL750 over the XL650, but have some concerns in the design I see:

* Only 5 die locations. I have a need to use both a case feeder and bullet feeder due to limited fine dexterity in my left hand. I am fine using both hands with tools in setup, but do not have the fine dexterity to seat small bullets. If I wish to use a "powder cop" or powder check, this setup would require use of a crimp / seat die instead of separate operates which I believe to better.

* Some of the linkages like for the powder drop fail safe, etc. look prone to breakage or bending.

I know the 1050 is a lot more in both initial cost and cost of quick change tool heads, caliber conversion, etc., however I looking at which press will I enjoy more over my lifetime? I am not in this to save money, but rather enjoy the technical aspect of reloading and developing improved loads. If it was down to the new RL1100 and the XL750, I would definitely go with the XL750 as the RL1100 does NOT handle my favorite rifle round (30-06) which I enjoy for long range shooting. The XL750 has a vast list of calibers that can be reloaded.

One last question: Along with 9 mm, I also shoot 38 Special and 357 Magnum. Could I use the same caliber conversion kit for 38/357 and just have separate quick change tool heads with dies for 38 and 357 Magnum?

Other rounds I plan to reload include .223/5.56 and 7.62 x 39 for which the 1050 could swage.

I am not dead set on either press, but as it is an investment, I want to make sure it serves me well for life.

David (WU3J)
 

AR Precision

Moderator
Staff member
wu3j, With the 750 or 650. you want have any linkage problems or breaking they are pretty tough,,, on the other questions I'll let someone else chime in on the press you want to choose.
have a good day
 

76Highboy

Administrator
Staff member
Looking at stepping up into reloading after experiencing a friends XL650 and weighing the difference between the XL750 and Super 1050. I very much like the changes in the XL750 over the XL650, but have some concerns in the design I see:

* Only 5 die locations. I have a need to use both a case feeder and bullet feeder due to limited fine dexterity in my left hand. I am fine using both hands with tools in setup, but do not have the fine dexterity to seat small bullets. If I wish to use a "powder cop" or powder check, this setup would require use of a crimp / seat die instead of separate operates which I believe to better.

* Some of the linkages like for the powder drop fail safe, etc. look prone to breakage or bending.

I know the 1050 is a lot more in both initial cost and cost of quick change tool heads, caliber conversion, etc., however I looking at which press will I enjoy more over my lifetime? I am not in this to save money, but rather enjoy the technical aspect of reloading and developing improved loads. If it was down to the new RL1100 and the XL750, I would definitely go with the XL750 as the RL1100 does NOT handle my favorite rifle round (30-06) which I enjoy for long range shooting. The XL750 has a vast list of calibers that can be reloaded.

One last question: Along with 9 mm, I also shoot 38 Special and 357 Magnum. Could I use the same caliber conversion kit for 38/357 and just have separate quick change tool heads with dies for 38 and 357 Magnum?

Other rounds I plan to reload include .223/5.56 and 7.62 x 39 for which the 1050 could swage.

I am not dead set on either press, but as it is an investment, I want to make sure it serves me well for life.

David (WU3J)
To answer your last question...yes. You can utilize the same caliber conversion for 38 Spl. and 357 Magnum on two quick change systems.

Highboy
 
I am definitely going to hold back on this as I am seeing grumbling from users of the XL750 that there is a design flaw that prevents both the Mr. Bulletfeeder and the powder check from being used at the same time. This is due to positioning of the powder drop and mechanisms interfering with the latter. I have also confirmed this directly with Double Alpha and the y are working on a fix. I will probably purchase a press over the winter or in early spring.

David
 
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