My Dillon 750

Veryolddog

Foxtrot Mike 8.5" 45 ACP SMG Pistol
@Russell : Very well thought out. I really do not have buyer's remorse. But having the experience of using a variety of presses in the last 8 years, my reflections are based upon the experience that I have had. My first progressive press that I had was the Lee LoadMaster. It was not a good experience and it is sitting in a closet right now. The next press was the Lee Turret Press. A good press but very light weight. It is also in a closet. The next press is the Redding T-7 Turret Press. Very high quality and solid like a Rock. I could load my Rifle and pistol cases without any trouble at all. Still operational. Next: the Dillon 550. Outstanding turret press that gives you the operator the chance of a semi-progressive with reliability, availability and performance. It can load both rifle and pistol, but I only load straight cases (pistol and revolver) on this unit. Then, the 750, which is in a class by itself. Put aside my start up experience, this beast can consistently pump out completed cases day in and day out without interruptions. I have this set up for 223, and in the last month, I have processed 800 cases of 223 and run out of 223 completely because when it is set up correctly, it works.

Now, I can reflect. Would I do things differently? Yes! What I have learned is:

1. I like to have a press set up to do one case and not change anything except the powder measure because I am using a different bullet. I have my 550 set up for 9mm which I use a lot and I process 100 to 150 cases per day. The 750 is set up for 223.

2. The cost going into the 750, for me as I am 77, retired, living on Social Security and a military pension, is enormous. For me, I could only cost justify the 750 is I ran multiple calibers through it to make it worth while. So, I have conversion kits for 9mm, 380, 38/357 magnum, 45 ACP, 44 Magnum, and 223. Not cheap. I have a 1000 pieces of 45 ACP Brass coming so I plan on setting it up for this next.

3. The cost for the 550 C is also expensive but not exponential as the 750. I do have conversion kits for 9mm, 45 ACP, 223. 38/357 Magnum.

4. Having multiple presses set up doing one thing exclusive is the optimum in processing cases. Once set up, the press can continue to perform consistently with very little modification. This is to say, that I could have purchased 3 to 4 more 550's to work on a specific caliber all of the time without change. Since I reload 243, 308, and 30-06 on the Redding T-7 along with the Forster Co-ox, I do not have to rely on a progressive press nor do I want to as I weigh each powder measure independently and set each bullet that way as well. The 223 would be the only caliber that I would load on a 550 or 750.

5. If I had gone the 550 route, all of the conversion kits would have been spread to each press.

6. The 750 is a beast. If you sat there for 4 hours and had the materials, (which I don't have nor the physical capability) you could pump out 2500 finished cases.

7. The 550 is no slouch, and for an average shooter, this product is a good match. I can produce 100 to 150 finished cases in an hour or so. I am probably very slow and I am not in a race. This also true for me on the 750.

8. If you are physically handicapped, like me, with a lot of arthritis in your hands, with diminished motor skills, the 750 is the press. It has the case feeder and you can also add a modest bullet feeder that minimizes interaction except for pulling the handle and reloading raw materials.

Ultimately, it is the individual's choice, whether you have "REAL" need or you are purchasing the press of your choice for "EGO" and get talked into it by others comments, is the thought for the day. If you have all the money in the world, then the decision is easy, Like Highboy who has multiple Dillon 750's and multiple Redding T-7's.
 

walterbunning

Load Data Eligible Ruger Blackhawk
Staff member
Ultimately, it is the individual's choice, whether you have "REAL" need or you are purchasing the press of your choice for "EGO" and get talked into it by others comments, is the thought for the day. If you have all the money in the world, then the decision is easy, Like Highboy who has multiple Dillon 750's and multiple Redding T-7's.
Well said. I’ll add one more to your choice factors. I have no REAL need for another press capable of high volume or more speed. Like you, I have plenty of quality presses. Nor do I need to feed my ego trying to “keep up with the Joneses”. I know what I’m doing and am quite capable of making fine ammo as it is. So here’s MY deal:

I enjoy the reloading process as much, if not more, as I do shooting. I would be looking at a new press much in the same way as another guy might be looking at yet another firearm purchase. I like using tools, especially well-made ones. Learning the ins and outs of a new Dillon would be fun for me and would hold my attention for a while. To that extent, I could probably justify the cost.

Wanna know what’s REALLY holding me back? I need a place to put it! A couple of my other presses would have to find another place to live. I have an idea for re-homing one of my S/S presses, the old Rock Chucker 2, and that would free up some space. I just hate to give up an old friend, LOL. More thought required. That’s MY story, and I’m stickin’ to it.

Incidentally, @Veryolddog , this has turned out to be a very interesting and thought-provoking thread. Thank you for starting it, and for putting up with all our comments!
 

Veryolddog

Foxtrot Mike 8.5" 45 ACP SMG Pistol
@walterbunning "I would be looking at a new press much in the same way as another guy might be looking at yet another firearm purchase. I like using tools, especially well-made ones. Learning the ins and outs of a new Dillon would be fun for me and would hold my attention for a while. To that extent, I could probably justify the cost. "

I totally concur with your thinking about this. That is the major reason why I purchased the Forster Co-ax and I really like it alot especially the feature where you do not need shell holders and the quick die change. The 750, I will admit, was purchased, because I had heard so much hype about it that I got talked into it and wanted to try it. The decision was not based upon need and functionality although I really LIKE the case feeding feature.

As one more note, I can make room for one more Dillon 550 C with great difficulty as I already have an Inline Fabrication stand that can take a quick change plate with a Dillon 550 C mounted on it. But then, I use that stand for multiple items with quick change plates like the Dillon Super Suage, the RCBS auto primer, the Lyman Universal trimmer and the Harbor Freight vise.
 
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Veryolddog,

@Russell : Very well thought out. I really do not have buyer's remorse. But having the experience of using a variety of presses in the last 8 years, my reflections are based upon the experience that I have had. My first progressive press that I had was the Lee LoadMaster. It was not a good experience and it is sitting in a closet right now. The next press was the Lee Turret Press. A good press but very light weight. It is also in a closet. The next press is the Redding T-7 Turret Press. Very high quality and solid like a Rock. I could load my Rifle and pistol cases without any trouble at all. Still operational. Next: the Dillon 550. Outstanding turret press that gives you the operator the chance of a semi-progressive with reliability, availability and performance. It can load both rifle and pistol, but I only load straight cases (pistol and revolver) on this unit. Then, the 750, which is in a class by itself. Put aside my start up experience, this beast can consistently pump out completed cases day in and day out without interruptions. I have this set up for 223, and in the last month, I have processed 800 cases of 223 and run out of 223 completely because when it is set up correctly, it works.

Now, I can reflect. Would I do things differently? Yes! What I have learned is:

1. I like to have a press set up to do one case and not change anything except the powder measure because I am using a different bullet. I have my 550 set up for 9mm which I use a lot and I process 100 to 150 cases per day. The 750 is set up for 223.

2. The cost going into the 750, for me as I am 77, retired, living on Social Security and a military pension, is enormous. For me, I could only cost justify the 750 is I ran multiple calibers through it to make it worth while. So, I have conversion kits for 9mm, 380, 38/357 magnum, 45 ACP, 44 Magnum, and 223. Not cheap. I have a 1000 pieces of 45 ACP Brass coming so I plan on setting it up for this next.

3. The cost for the 550 C is also expensive but not exponential as the 750. I do have conversion kits for 9mm, 45 ACP, 223. 38/357 Magnum.

4. Having multiple presses set up doing one thing exclusive is the optimum in processing cases. Once set up, the press can continue to perform consistently with very little modification. This is to say, that I could have purchased 3 to 4 more 550's to work on a specific caliber all of the time without change. Since I reload 243, 308, and 30-06 on the Redding T-7 along with the Forster Co-ox, I do not have to rely on a progressive press nor do I want to as I weigh each powder measure independently and set each bullet that way as well. The 223 would be the only caliber that I would load on a 550 or 750.

5. If I had gone the 550 route, all of the conversion kits would have been spread to each press.

6. The 750 is a beast. If you sat there for 4 hours and had the materials, (which I don't have nor the physical capability) you could pump out 2500 finished cases.

7. The 550 is no slouch, and for an average shooter, this product is a good match. I can produce 100 to 150 finished cases in an hour or so. I am probably very slow and I am not in a race. This also true for me on the 750.

8. If you are physically handicapped, like me, with a lot of arthritis in your hands, with diminished motor skills, the 750 is the press. It has the case feeder and you can also add a modest bullet feeder that minimizes interaction except for pulling the handle and reloading raw materials.

Ultimately, it is the individual's choice, whether you have "REAL" need or you are purchasing the press of your choice for "EGO" and get talked into it by others comments, is the thought for the day. If you have all the money in the world, then the decision is easy, Like Highboy who has multiple Dillon 750's and multiple Redding T-7's.
That’s a fascinating & very valuable summation of your progressive press experience. The first paragraph alone should provide a lot of food for thought for anyone going that route & the remainder of your post providing even more insight. Equally valuable in a more theoretical sense for anyone like myself who would ‘like’ but doesn’t ‘need’ one.

Your points regarding firstly using a fully progressive machine (i.e. a 750) to load as many calibers as possible to justify the expense - but secondly, highlighting the desirability of keeping a press set-up for just one calibre, whilst contrary to each other, both of course make equal sense depending on circumstances.

Your narrative really brings home the need for some enjoyable ‘soul searching’ to be done by the potential purchaser before they walk through the doors of Dillion’s (or whoever’s) showroom.

As you say - one way out of the dilemma is to have a bench full of 750’s!

Regards
Russell
 
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Well said. I’ll add one more to your choice factors. I have no REAL need for another press capable of high volume or more speed. Like you, I have plenty of quality presses. Nor do I need to feed my ego trying to “keep up with the Joneses”. I know what I’m doing and am quite capable of making fine ammo as it is. So here’s MY deal:

I enjoy the reloading process as much, if not more, as I do shooting. I would be looking at a new press much in the same way as another guy might be looking at yet another firearm purchase. I like using tools, especially well-made ones. Learning the ins and outs of a new Dillon would be fun for me and would hold my attention for a while. To that extent, I could probably justify the cost.
Walter,

I can certainly identify with your thoughts above. I too enjoy using nice ‘tools’ particularly when associated with shooting. I also enjoy trying to improve presses in some small way or restoring interesting ones - I’ve just got a CH-444 back in action.

Regards
Russell
 

walterbunning

Load Data Eligible Ruger Blackhawk
Staff member
Good Morning Walter, The Blue Force is strong, it keeps pulling me towards a XL750!!!
On my Hornady if everything is adjusted properly I can load more rounds per hour if the planets and stars are in proper allignment..and the force is with me....😀😁😂🤣😆😉😃
Yep, ditto.
Feel the Blue Force Obe Wan....It's calling to us...."Get the XL750".....😉🙂

Reb
This stinkin' forum costs me more money tryin' to SAVE money. Yeesh. That 750 9mm unit is still sitting in my LGS. :unsure:
 

Veryolddog

Foxtrot Mike 8.5" 45 ACP SMG Pistol
Yep, ditto.

This stinkin' forum costs me more money tryin' to SAVE money. Yeesh. That 750 9mm unit is still sitting in my LGS. :unsure:
@walterbunning : It is my understanding that you are a retired policeman. Thanks for serving. Then you know that life is short, then you die. Buy the damm thing and give yourself a nice present for surviving this far.
 

walterbunning

Load Data Eligible Ruger Blackhawk
Staff member
@walterbunning : It is my understanding that you are a retired policeman. Thanks for serving. Then you know that life is short, then you die. Buy the damm thing and give yourself a nice present for surviving this far.
Yer killin’ me here. But it COULD happen. I can’t believe that poor press is going un-adopted in today’s market.
 

Veryolddog

Foxtrot Mike 8.5" 45 ACP SMG Pistol
Yer killin’ me here. But it COULD happen. I can’t believe that poor press is going un-adopted in today’s market.
I saw a Dillon 550 B at my LGS in San Antonio yesterday. I told them this press was obsolete and that Dillon does not make it anymore. I offered them $250.00 but they declined. I am fully aware that I could purchase from Dillon a 550 C without the Conversion Kit for $457.00. Hey....I am 77, my wife is set in my absence. I might as well live till I die.
 

COWBOY4570

Load Data Eligible Marlin 1895 Cowboy 45-70
Staff member
Well said. I’ll add one more to your choice factors. I have no REAL need for another press capable of high volume or more speed. Like you, I have plenty of quality presses. Nor do I need to feed my ego trying to “keep up with the Joneses”. I know what I’m doing and am quite capable of making fine ammo as it is. So here’s MY deal:

I enjoy the reloading process as much, if not more, as I do shooting. I would be looking at a new press much in the same way as another guy might be looking at yet another firearm purchase. I like using tools, especially well-made ones. Learning the ins and outs of a new Dillon would be fun for me and would hold my attention for a while. To that extent, I could probably justify the cost.

Wanna know what’s REALLY holding me back? I need a place to put it! A couple of my other presses would have to find another place to live. I have an idea for re-homing one of my S/S presses, the old Rock Chucker 2, and that would free up some space. I just hate to give up an old friend, LOL. More thought required. That’s MY story, and I’m stickin’ to it.

Incidentally, @Veryolddog , this has turned out to be a very interesting and thought-provoking thread. Thank you for starting it, and for putting up with all our comments!
Exactly Walter, I don't have the need for another press, I have 2 T7 presses,and 2 Dillon 550C presses,and a couple Rockchuckers . For the volume of ammo that I process,that is plenty. All that said,I enjoy reloading, and still think it would be awesome to have an XL750 handle to crank on lol
 
Great thread!!! Most all of my components have arrived for my recently ordered 750. Cant wait for the press to arrive (3 weeks waiting as of today).

Once I get it all arranged and my credit card statements arrive, I’ll try to put together a table of what I ordered for my particular setup, with itemized and total costs. I suspect it will be a real eye opener for some of those interested in going this direction. My credit card is glowing red hot the last couple weeks...

Stand by to Standby.
 
The more I hear and see, the stronger the Blue Force pulls me. I have a lot invested in my Hornady LNL, and with 5 or 6 calibers I load in high volume, I struggle with the finances of making the conversion(s). Maybe if I started with just 2 calibers. More to think on.
That is what I thought also until I put my LNL on ebay and got 790.00 for it. It did have 5 shell plates, 45acp dies and a few other things but I was amazed at the prices that equipment brings on ebay
 
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