Winchester Model 1892 in .357 Mag

Regarding the current production Winchester 1892 - if anyone has one in .357 Mag & uses cast lead bullets - do the rifles have any preferences as regards bullet shape, sized diameter etc from a feeding & accuracy point of view?

I’m not a after actual load data just an idea of what bullets are worth looking at first or worth avoiding.

I’ve cast plenty of bullets in the past but this time I’ll be buying ready-cast ones around 158 grains & there’s quite a wide range of shapes, weights & sizes available in the UK. The rifle will be used for various ‘end of trail’ sort of events.

Regards
Russell
 

Critter9a

Load Data Eligible Henry steel 357 Magnum
Staff member
I have the Henry steel and a Coonan in 357m I use coated 158gr. the coated bullet doesn't leave much trash in your barrel like traditional bullets do.
 

infobros

Load Data Eligible SigSaur 1911
Staff member
Regarding the current production Winchester 1892 - if anyone has one in .357 Mag & uses cast lead bullets - do the rifles have any preferences as regards bullet shape, sized diameter, etc from a feeding & accuracy point of view?

I’m not after actual load data just an idea of what bullets are worth looking at first or worth avoiding.

I’ve cast plenty of bullets in the past but this time I’ll be buying ready-cast ones around 158 grains & there’s quite a wide range of shapes, weights & sizes available in the UK. The rifle will be used for various ‘end of trail’ sort of events.

Regards
Russell
I copied this from the WinchesterOwners.com site:


Post
Posted: Wed Jul 03, 2013, 4:54 pm

luckybaer wrote:Just ordered a new Model 1892 Carbine in .357 (534177137).
What kind of ammo can anyone recommend? FMJ? JHP? Any particular brand or size of bullet?
How about .38 special rounds? Can those be shot without any bad side effects on the rifle?
Thanks!
Just a word of CAUTION to new Winchester lever-action owners (except for Model 1895). Regardless of caliber NEVER, EVER shoot cartridges with FMJ or lead "pointed" bullets, FMJ or lead "round nose" bullets, or even the FMJ or lead semi-wadcutter bullets through your tubular magazine fed Winchester lever-action rifles. After loading cartridges in your tubular magazine, they're positioned such that the bullet point of each cartridge sits directly against the primer of the cartridge in front of it. The DANGER with pointed bullets is that under recoil these bullet points act as a firing pin and can cause one or more of the cartridges in the tubular magazine to inadvertently discharge. With a full magazine, this would result in a chain reaction which will not only destroy the rifle but could result in the loss of your life and those around you. REMEMBER, round nose & SWC bullets are just as dangerous as pointed bullets. In addition to recoil causing the accidental discharge, dropping the rifle can also cause tubular discharges, as can the simple act of dropping a second, third, or fourth, etc. cartridge down the tube and its primer contacting the pointed or round bullet with the slightest pressure.

Round Nose Flat Point bullets are standard fare for these rifles. If you decide to hand load these cartridges, you need to make sure NOT to have any high primers, regardless of bullet type you use. Hollowpoint bullets, depending on their design might be safely used, however, you must make sure that no part of the front edge of this bullet design has any possibility of contacting the primer of the cartridge in front of it in the tubular magazine.

Truncated cone bullets have shown greater accuracy than RNFP bullets when being shot through Single Action Army revolvers. However, if you plan to test these truncated cone bullets with your Winchester lever rifle you must make sure that the diameter of their flat point is much larger than the diameter of your primers.
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I've never owned a lever action with a tube magazine but I have always wanted one. I've read posts from others here to the same effect about the dangers of recoil with pointed, or other bullets. I hope this helps you make a decision Russell. Have fun with it.
 

Alpo

*Load Data Eligible TSMG 1928 AC
Staff member
I don't know why you say that semi wadcutter bullets could cause detonation. They have a flat point. I have not seen any that would work with a lever rifle that have a point that is small enough that it would be resting on the primer.

I have two Winchester 1892s from the 19 teens, five Rossi 1892s from the 1990s through early 2000s, and one Browning 1892. 32/20, 357, 38/40, 44/40, 44 magnum and 45 Colt. I feed them all RNF bullets. 115 grain, 158 grain, 180 grain, 220 grain, 240 grain, and 255 grain. I have never had a problem with any of the eight guns not feeding.

My first one was a Rossi 357, and I shot nothing but semi wadcutter in it for at least four years. I went to the round nose flat when I was trying to go faster.
 

infobros

Load Data Eligible SigSaur 1911
Staff member
I don't know why you say that semi-wadcutter bullets could cause detonation. They have a flat point. I have not seen any that would work with a lever rifle that has a point that is small enough that it would be resting on the primer.

I have two Winchester 1892s from the 19 teens, five Rossi 1892s from the 1990s through the early 2000s, and one Browning 1892. 32/20, 357, 38/40, 44/40, 44 magnum and 45 Colt. I feed them all RNF bullets. 115 grain, 158 grain, 180 grain, 220 grain, 240 grain, and 255 grain. I have never had a problem with any of the eight guns not feeding.

My first one was a Rossi 357, and I shot nothing but semi-wadcutter in it for at least four years. I went to the round nose flat when I was trying to go faster.
I didn't say it, Alpo, somebody from the WinchesterOwners.com site did back in 2013. I looked for something that would answer Russell's question and it seemed to have the information he requested. As I said, I don't own a lever-action rifle. I have, however, read warnings from other sources about loading these types of bullets in a tubular magazine due to the danger of detonation from recoil or accident. I'm happy nothing has ever happened to you, I hope nothing ever does. If you read what was said, it pointed out that you need to make sure the primer was seated deep enough so there could be no chance of contact with the other bullets even if they are the flat nose, hollow points, or semi-wadcutters. That's just common sense.
 
Thanks to all for the useful comments & advice.

I’d found that a Rossi clone of the 1892 tended to put a deep mark on the nose of one cast lead bullet shape we were using but a change to another slightly different (but still flat nosed) shape had it feeding without a mark - hence I was wondering if the current production Winchester 1892 had any preferences.

The requirement for flat nosed bullets in tubular magazines as highlighted in that extract from the Winchester Owners forum is always worth repeating. I do think the writer of that piece must have a different interpretation of what shape a SWC bullet is as one defining feature of a SWC is a large flat nose. The basic point about safety was important & well made though.

Of the commercially cast lead 38, 44 & 45 cal bullets sold in the UK the vast majority of them are used in lever action rifles so whilst there’s a good selection of shapes & weights (plus lubed or coated) they are virtually all suitable for tubular magazines.

I have the option of .356, .357 & .358” sized diameter bullets, I’ve heard (rightly or wrongly) that modern Marlin barrels prefer the larger sizes but I not seen any recommendations for the Winchester.

Regards
Russell
 

Reb Tyree

Load Data Elibible CZ75B SA
I have a Uberti copy of the 1866"Yellow boy" Winchester in 45 Colt. I run "Round Nose Flat Point" bullets in it. I have run some SWC, that had the WFN and had no problems. Also have a couple of Marlins, a 336 30-30, and an 1895 in 45-70.

Safety is key, to avoid any catastrophic failure in tubular magazines, WFN, RNFP or SWC bullets with a larger meplat only, to avoid any contact with the primer/ primer pocket.

Reb
 
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